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JPAM’s Quest For Democracy Is Suspicious – Col. Samson Mande

Sweden-based NRA historical, Col Samson Mande has lashed at former Prime Minister Amama Mbabazi, saying his “quest for democracy is suspicious.”

As a fearless combatant and resolute commander, Mande actively participated in the 5-year NRA struggle that saw President Museveni take over power in 1986.

During the bush war, Mbabazi was attached to the external wing which was charged with mobilisation of funds and logistics for the armed rebellion.

The relationship between Mbabazi and Mande has for long been sour, with the exiled army officer accusing the former NRM Secretary General of abusing NRA’s funds during the bush war.

Mande today noted that Mbabazi’s 2016 presidential bid declaration was his constitutional right but quickly added that the latter remains unprincipled and power hungry.Amama Mbabazi has declared his intentions to contest for the country's top job next year

Amama Mbabazi has declared his intentions to contest for the country’s top job next year

“I have been informed that the learned Mbabazi is a smart, intelligent and wise, patient politician who doesnt make mistakes or uninformed decisions,” said Mande.

“While I agree with this thought, his track record in the struggle in which I have know him since the 1971 -1979 struggle against the Military regime of Idi Amini R.I.P., to the 1981-1986 struggle against the UPC regime, leaves a lot to be desired,” he observed.

“I wonder if when one masters deceit, intrigue and is artiful in dodging responsibility, accountabliity and prosecution should be called smart.”

Mande said, “For real, in my opinion Mbabazi is not the kind of leader Uganda of today needs. He has been the conductor of the yellow bus directing the driver of the right pass to take, where to stop, allowing passengers in, telling them where to sit , and when to get them off the bus” in reference to steering the work of government and NRM party.

He also pointed out that, “For many years Mbabazi was solely preparing the budget with a lion share going to defence and State House, neglecting agriculture which employs the majority, education and healthcare and other crucial services.”

Mande said whoever opposed Mbabazi’s style of leadership was called a ‘rebel.’

Mande described Mbabazi as a “gentleman who could nolonger understand the importance of privacy for citizens and advised that phone tapping should be decreed. The right or freedom of assembly, he monopolised through initiating, sponsoring and passing the Public Order Management Act. (POMA). This will do alot to undermine his strenth and I don’t see his chances in the 2016 elections. The highest his money shall give him is 2 percent, that is if his party the NRM will allow him to stand.”

In his declaration, Mbabazi said he would tackle bad governance and corruption; improve education and healthcare.

Mande said JPAM was well known for “shouting ‘No Change’ like a Vuvuzela and he has nothing new to offer apart from crying for his turn to rule Uganda as number one.”

Many pundits have questioned Mbabazi’s claims that he intends to transform Uganda, saying all along he was seated at the centre of power during his reign as Defence Minister, Security Minister and Prime Minister but never used such opportunities to advance people’s aspirations.

Mande maintained the last 30 years Mbabazi has been in power was enough for him to demonstrate transformative politics.

“He had the goodwill from the president, the people of Uganda and the international community. He has lost much of that; mention any ministry he was made in charge of and corruption didn’t thrive there? Diversion of donors’ money meant to rehabilitate the poor Ugandans returning from IDPs in Northern Uganda left Mbabazi in bad books of the international community. If he was not protected from prosecution JPAM would be sharing a floor with Mr Kazinda in Luzira.”

Mbabazi said then he was only a political head and therefore not responsible for the plunder of donor support funds at OPM.

Mande further said “Mbabazi’s constituents, neighbours in Kinkiizi West, Kanungu district who were maimed by the ex premier’s campaign agents during the 2001 elections so that he could come to Parliament by force are still limping uncompensated.”

He expressed shock that, “Some time ago I read when he JPAM stated that he can never stand when his long time ally president M7 is also standing. JPAM went to Kyankwanzi to put their weight behind the resolution to make his friend M7 the sole candidate.”

He went ahead to expose JPAM as a thief and a career parasite on Ugandans . This is a cheap fellow that has no shame to try and sell milk on twitter because someone has claimed to be an investor in Milk-not mentioning his corrupt wife-Jacqueline Mbabazi that brought down the Army enterprise when she was Luweero Industries general manager.

At the time,trading under Luweero Industries Limited, a subsidiary of the National Enterprises Corporation (NEC), they repaired and also sold small arms to private companies as well as exporting the bullets to neighboring countries. The company also fabricated armored cars(Kiwani style) which were later sold to the Ministry of Defence. At the time, an AK47 gun at the factory cost about US$150. Thus,the factory could produce up to 20 lots, each lot consisting of 12 huge boxes of ammunition. Each bullet was said to cost about US$6 depending on the gun category. You can now understand why the region is flooded with small arms and mostly in the hands of criminals.

However,in a typical micro management style of the JPAM family,Other companies under NEC included NEC Lime (Dura), NEC pharmaceutical, NEC Katonga Farm and UPDF Tailoring Unit. At the end of the day, the Enterprise became bankrupt with no financial management records to show.

How can we forget the personalisation of Uganda Revenue authority by Jacqueline Mbabazi ,when she was the customs commissioner, when she issued circulars to border post custom officials to not tax and let contra-band goods into the republic of Uganda, because she could do it.

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